Dear Self

So there has been a lot of buzz in the running community about an article Self published about how running in tutu's made their "+BS" meter. They featured two women running in tutus wearing super hero shirts and mockingly stated:

"New Running Tulle - A racing tutu epidemic has struck NYC's Central Park, and it's all because people think these froufrou skirts make you run faster. Now, if you told us they made people run away from you faster, maybe we would believe it"

Really, Self? The 2 women in the photo, that they provided because they didn't realize they were going to be mocked, are fabulous women. 1 was running her first marathon while battling a brain tumor (and yes the tutu improved her mood and thus probably her performance that day, Self) and they both were part of the Girls on the Run organization who sell handmade tutus to raise money to support young girls running their first 5k. This org supports getting young girls active, increasing their self-esteem, and teaching them skills that will help them as they develop into adults and all the challenges they will face along the way.

These would be things you would assume a magazine focused on female fitness would support, but if you've ever actually picked up a copy recently, you'll find out differently. Self is nothing but a glamorized fitness magazine with every exercise article tooting toning and flatness, not strength and fitness.

Some examples from their website:

Home Page
Fit "tricks"? Being "eye-molested" at the gym? Better butt moves? Yeah, this makes sense as "above the fold" articles for a fitness magazine! I enjoy not seeing the word "health" or "strength" on a fitness magazine's home page.



Most Popular Articles
Why no articles about strength?

The Header on the "Fitness" Page
An article on toning, one on candy, another on skin care, gear, oh, and finally a fitness article about a workout!



In high school, when I hated my body and didn't appreciate it for the power it had, I poured over this magazine because it catered to this crowd. I wanted the quick fix that would magically make me love my body and get guys to notice. Today, it makes my stomach churn because it triggers that memory of self-loathing and makes my stomach churn thinking women still think like this. Now, they do have some articles with good exercises in it but in general they are focused on beach bods, flat abs, and how to look good for the "him" in your life, not what I would call fitness.

I know fitness no matter how someone finds it is still worthwhile, but I don't enjoy being told my abs aren't flat enough to be considered fit or my butt isn't toned enough to be considered nice in jeans.

Runners just stay away from this magazine, it's not worth your time. Stick to fitness magazines which focus on fitness and not on "How can I workout to look cute in my jeans?" I know I don't appreciate being pandered to in this way.

This is my 2 cents feel free to leave your thoughts!